Introduction

Introduction

Adult carers provide regular and ongoing care to a family member who has a long-term illness, disability, mental health issue or who misuses substances. 

The family member may be their partner, parent, child or even a neighbour who couldn’t manage their day-to-day lives without their help. 

Adult carers provide regular and ongoing care to a family member who has a long-term illness, disability, mental health issue or who misuses substances. 

The family member may be their partner, parent, child or even a neighbour who couldn’t manage their day-to-day lives without their help. 

Caring can be a lifelong commitment for some (for example, parent carers looking after a disabled child) or short-term but intensive (for example, caring for someone after a critical incident such as a stroke). 

For many, caring can happen later in life when their own health is starting to deteriorate and we have high numbers of carers over 70 years who are caring for their husband or wife with dementia or significant physical disabilities associated with age.

Caring can be a lifelong commitment for some (for example, parent carers looking after a disabled child) or short-term but intensive (for example, caring for someone after a critical incident such as a stroke). 

For many, caring can happen later in life when their own health is starting to deteriorate and we have high numbers of carers over 70 years who are caring for their husband or wife with dementia or significant physical disabilities associated with age.

Whilst caring can be enjoyable, for many the responsibilities can have a significant impact on the physical and mental health of those providing the care. 

Our services provide support that makes caring a little easier and that helps carers to stay physically fit, active and socially engaged.

Whilst caring can be enjoyable, for many the responsibilities can have a significant impact on the physical and mental health of those providing the care. 

Our services provide support that makes caring a little easier and that helps carers to stay physically fit, active and socially engaged.